Tag Archives: histamine intolerance

Normal test results

I’m the healthiest sick person you’ll ever meet.  Despite having Spinal Stenosis, MCAD and EDS from birth, M.E., Histamine Intolerance, Endometriosis and Adenomyosis 98% of all my test results have come back “normal”, at least according to my Doctors.  It will not surprise you that my response to that is “knickers!”.

When I was 11 I was climbing in some outbuildings and fell from the first floor onto the bonnet of a car, after which I developed back pain.  For the next 5 years I went backwards and forwards to the hospital who could find no reason for my symptoms.  X-ray results were “normal” and eventually I was told I was “attention seeking” and needed to see a shrink.  I refused and demanded a second opinion from an Orthopaed at a decent hospital 90 miles away (I was bolshy even at 16 😉 ).  Within 48 hours of being admitted they discovered I had been born with rare congenital spinal stenosis and urgently needed a laminectomy.  The fall wasn’t the cause of my back issue but had just aggravated a pre-existing condition.

This was my first experience that Doctors aren’t Gods and sometimes get it wrong and over the coming years I was to discover that they get it wrong more often than any of us would like.

It’s only in the past 5 years or so that NHS patients in the UK have been given access to their test results.  Historically, GPs would take loads of blood, not even tell you what you were being tested for and the results were sent back to the GP who only ever rang you if something abnormal was discovered.  But a GP’s idea of “normal” results and my idea of “normal” results seem to differ.

As I’ve discussed recently here on my blog, at the tail end of last year I started having symptoms of anaemia so asked my GP to check my iron levels.  They came back 1 point above the very bottom rung of “normal” (normal range 17-160 according to my lab sheet, and my result was 18), so my GP considered that fine.  Only of course it wasn’t fine because I was having symptoms.  I took it upon myself to start some supplements and within a week the pallor, exhaustion and daily dizziness I’d had for months vanished.  But if hadn’t gone to the surgery to request a print-out of my results and seen that my levels were low my GP would have just said everything was “normal”, I wouldn’t have tried the supplements and would have continued to feel like death warmed up.

When I saw Dr Seneviratne for my histamine/creatinine test it was high but within the “normal” range (normal is 34-177 and mine was 140).  However I’d been on a low histamine diet for 4 months at that stage, which one would hope would lower my histamine load and therefore skew the result, plus was symptomatic (at the time of testing my bum was covered in hives).  So thankfully Dr S still diagnosed me with “probable” MCAD because my history fairly conclusively suggested it.  But not all Doctors think like that – they see “normal” test results and rely on those, even when all the evidence is pointing towards there being a problem.

I’ve had severe gynae pain since the day I started my periods and over the years have had various tests and scans all of which were “normal”.  Well, apart from the fact my first ovarian scan showed a 2cm cyst which I was told was cyclical (they know this how?!) and 12 years later my second ovarian scan showed a 5cm cyst.  Turns out I have polysystic ovaries and due to my endo some were blood filled and when they burst caused excruciating pain and adhesions :-/  My first pelvic MRI at my local hospital showed absolutely nothing untoward, yet an MRI at a specialist endo centre six months later showed extensive endometriosis which even I could see on the scan!  So it turned out that the excruciating pain I’d lived with for the better part of 40 years wasn’t “normal” after all and I needed an urgent hysterectomy.

Anyone with Hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome will tell you how painful and disabling the condition can be, yet nothing shows up on tests.  Genes and skin are normal, as are scans and x-rays.  Before I suspected hEDS I was told by medical staff that I was just “sensitive to pain” which made me feel like a total loser – little did they know I lived with pain most days that would have a healthy person reaching for the Vicodin and I did it without so much as a murmur, so far from being sensitive to pain the opposite was, in fact, true.

Here’s the thing I wish Doctors took more on board – if a person is having symptoms there is a problem, even if test results look “normal”.  I wish they’d listen more to what we’re telling them, take a full history and trust that we know our bodies better than they do.  What is “normal” for a 6ft 4″, 16 stone, male, thirtysomething rugby player might not be “normal” for a 5Ft, 7stone, teenage girl.

Back pain at the age of 11 is not “normal”.  Gynae pain so severe you’re curled up in the foetal position every month is not “normal”.  Fainting is not “normal”.  Widespread pain is not “normal”.  Seizures are not “normal”.  Fatigue which puts you in bed by 4pm every day is not “normal”.  Collapsing after every meal is not “normal”.  Flushing is not “normal”.  Daily nausea is not “normal”.   I don’t care that all my tests indicated nothing was  wrong, because something clearly was and it wasn’t something trivial to cause that much havoc.

My cynicism towards the medical profession is now legendary – that’s what comes of being fobbed off or 40 years that all is well.  In the end, I had to guess what my diseases were and inform my Doctors, who then did the relevant tests which, surprise!, came back not normal in any way 😉  I trusted my instincts, even though when I was younger I didn’t have enough confidence to challenge my Doctors.  I know there are some people who are hyper-vigilant and obsessive and who think they have some dreaded disease from every little ache, pain and niggle (I’ve met some of them online!) but I know my personality and know that I’m not a drama queen or someone who focuses abnormally on my body (again, the opposite is true and I actually ignore symptoms when I really shouldn’t!).

These days I’ve gained a fair bit of knowledge about my body and I know what’s normal for me and what’s not.  If I’m not happy with a consultation I’ll research the best doctor to see and request a referral even if it’s hundreds of miles away (which is my legal right).  I request a copy of my test results and will push for treatment or further testing if I think it’s needed.  After all, I’m the one who has to live in my body and suffer my symptoms, not my Doctor.

 

Weekly roundup

This week was the first of my stay-cation but I’ve been so busy I think I’m going to need another holiday to get over my holiday 😉  Back pain aside, however, it’s been a fabulous few days and I’ve enjoyed every second.

On Monday a friend and I went to photograph wild Red Squirrels.   They are native to Britain but in the late 1800s North American Grey Squirrels were let loose in the UK (for reasons unknown) and over the years they have decimated the native Red Squirrel population, not least because greys carry squirrel pox to which they are immune but the reds are not.  We have one of the few remaining red populations here in Cumbria but they are very timid and shy animals and very difficult to capture on film.  But I managed it and had an enchanting hour sat by a tiny waterfall in woodland watching 3 reds foraging for food:

Thursday I had a lovely day with my best mate, having lunch out to celebrate her birthday.  I had taken a shot of a local stone circle and, having seen that on my Facebook page, my friend had asked for it to be printed off for her birthday.  I’m a shit landscape photographer so was extremely flattered that she’d liked it enough to put it on her wall.  I went the extra mile and had a custom frame made and even I admit it turned out nice.

Thursday night didn’t quite go to plan as I discussed in my last blog post, however I still made it out on Friday night to my Camera Club’s annual awards dinner.  Food was fab, company was great and I walked off with 3 trophies for winning the Summer Challenge, the Intermediate Print League and the Intermediate Digital Image League – there was much ribbing about me needing a wheelbarrow to take my haul home and an extension built on my house to put them in 😉  As a bit of fun we had to produce an image we’d taken with a caption and I also won the caption competition:

Saturday I had booked to go on a short Portrait photography workshop.  It was a stupid thing to do considering I’d been out the night before and knew I’d be absolutely knackered but there was a reason to the madness – I needed a distraction from the fact that 300 miles away 6 judges were looking at a panel of 10 of my photographs and assessing me for my first photographic distinction!  So off I toddled to the workshop along with 5 other people from my camera club.  I have to admit it wasn’t that great and made worse by being so tired and still having awful back pain, but having said all that it was interesting to be in a proper photography studio with expensive lights and stuff.  I managed to get a nice image of the model too, though it still needs some work:

After the workshop finished I tentatively checked my phone and saw I’d received a text from someone I know who was at the Distinction Panel – I held my breath as I opened it.  Hurrahhh I had passed and can now put the letters CPAGB after my name! 🙂

So, as weeks go this has been one of my best in a long time.  I’ve way over-done it and will suffer the consequences over the coming days but I don’t care!  I’ve spent time with fabulous people doing the things I love and life doesn’t get much better than that.

Weekly roundup

I do not have pretty legs.  Along with the ‘elephant knuckles’ on my hands I seem to have ‘elephant knees’, and in addition I’m bow legged due to my flat feet and consequently rolling ankles.  It’s my Camera Club’s annual dinner and awards presentation this Friday and one thing’s for sure, I won’t be wearing a skirt which is a shame because, although I’m not the most girlie girl in the world, I am female and it would be nice now and again to wear something pretty.  The situation has not been helped by all the bruises I managed to acquire while helping my neighbour last week.  I’ve no clue how I got them, they just appeared, but they sure aint ladylike!  Is it just me who thinks the bruises on my right knee have made a face?  And the ‘face’ on my left knee looks like it’s winking LOL!

For about 5 days this week I had bags of energy.  At the time I had no idea why but was grateful and made the most of it 🙂  I got all sorts done, then woke up Tuesday morning to discover my period had arrived.  I was only on day 19 so it was completely unexpected, bearing in mind my cycle last month was 32 days.  Due to my endometriosis I usually have plenty of warning when my period is on the way in the form of back and stomach pain, but this month nada.  I can’t believe some women go through their whole lives like that, just having periods and it’s no big deal.  I’ve never had a pain-less period in my entire life and it was wonderful but weird!  I’m now putting my preceding energy spurt down to hugely surging hormones.

The few days since my period has ended have not been as great.  I appear to be having post-period tension and am like a weepy bear with a sore head.  My dwindling hormones also give rise to spotting for days on end and my back and reflux are rubbish.  My proprioception is also way off and I’ve spent three days banging into the furniture, dropping every item I pick up and spilling everything from my morning cuppa to the liquid which goes in my washing machine draw.  It’s driving me nuts!

To add insult to injury my cold-induced cough is still lingering.  Three weeks of hacking up phlegm when you’re already ill is pants and I just wish it would do one.

Wednesday was my last Camera Club of the season and we won’t meet again until September.  I’ll really miss it.  It’s the only time I ever get to see people and I enjoy being sociable as much as I enjoy the photography.  However, at the same time I do find the 2 hours I spend there exhausting.  Thursdays are always a right-off and I’m still suffering the consequences on Friday.  Bertie will be happy though.  He’s usually fed at 4.30pm then sleeps til 6am the next morning – having to go out in the cold at 6pm to be dropped off at his Nannie and Granda’s and not getting back home til 10pm makes him tired and grumpy 😉

I started a 2 week stay-cation on Friday.  As regular readers will know, I decided that I deserve holidays just like everyone else and although I can’t afford, and am not well enough, to go away that doesn’t mean I can’t abandon my parents and my home for a fortnight three times a year.  I’ve made sure my Mum and Dad don’t need anything doing, I’ve cooked and frozen enough meals to see me through and caught up with my laundry.  Apart from still having to take Bertie out, I’m spending my days doing what I want and not thinking about anyone else for a change.  Bliss 🙂

Today is Easter Sunday.  Like most heathens the religious significance passes me by, but I am going out with my parents for lunch which I’m both looking forward to (getting out of the house and not having to cook) and dreading (Dad being scatty and Mum being drunk).  Whatever you’re all up to I hope you have a lovely day 🙂

Fear & Worry

Over the last couple of decades of being sick I’ve ‘met’ (mostly online) hundreds, if not thousands, of people.  Many of them are beside themselves with worry and fear and I want to say to them “mate, take a chill pill” but that’s because I’m much further along the road than they are in dealing with chronic illness and have realized the futility of worry and fear.  I’m not trying to tell anyone how to feel, but just thought I’d share my journey with these emotions and how I managed to end up in a place of relative calm.

The first two years I had M.E. I was worried sick.  I couldn’t work, my finances were a mess, my relationship was falling apart and although my Doctor kept telling me I’d be better in two years because everyone with M.E. got better in two years (!), it wasn’t happening.  Then I got meningitis and all hell broke loose.  I thought I’d been sick before but it was nothing in comparison to the living death of severe M.E.  Now I worried every day that I might die, and nearly did.

After 4 years, I realized I couldn’t live with the worry about my relationship falling apart for another second.  So I dumped my boyfriend.  It was painful, but I needed to concentrate on my needs not live in fear every day that he would find someone else or dump me.  The worry was exhausting and I didn’t have the energy for it – I was too busy trying to find the energy just to breathe in and out.

After year 6 of being bedridden, and worrying every day I might die, I finally decided that dying would be a relief.  I was so tortured by my symptoms that I actually prayed to not wake up in a morning.  I stopped fighting, and stopped worrying, and that’s when I started to recover.  Weird huh?

My biggest fear M.E.-wise these days is that I’ll relapse and end up bedridden again.  I honestly don’t think I could live through that twice, so my internal dialogue tells me I don’t have to.  If it comes to that I’ll just kill myself and save myself the torture.  So now I don’t worry too much because I have an opt out.

My Ehlers-Danlos is currently the least of my worries.  Yes it’s painful and can make me miserable, but at the moment it’s liveable with.  If I were to think about my old age (which at nearly 50 isn’t that far off!), living in poverty, becoming increasing disabled and having no help or care I’d be worried stupid, so I simply don’t think about it.  I have enough on my plate getting through the day without panicking about a future which is at best uncertain – I could get run over by a bus tomorrow and all that worry about the future would have been for nothing.

My Mast Cell Disease, on the other hand, is a different kettle of fish.  I live every single day in fear of anaphylaxis and ultimately death.  I have to take H2 antihistamines for my GERD, without which I am suicidal with pain, yet after every single tablet I hold my breath for an hour waiting to have a reaction.  I’ve taken H2s before and tolerated them fine for 18 months before my body rejected them, so it’s not an unreasonable fear to have.   Each time I take a pill my internal dialogue goes something like this:

What if I have a reaction?  What if I can no longer tolerate them and have to live with horrendous acid reflux?
Well Jak, what if you do?
But I can’t live with horrendous acid reflux!
You might have to.
But I CAN’T.   It’s too painful!
You haven’t tried PPIs before, maybe you can tolerate those instead.
Yes, you’re right, maybe I can.
So if you do become allergic to the H2s again, there’s always the option of the PPIs.
Yes, I’m comforted by that.

By which time at least half and hour has gone by, and I realize I’m not having a reaction and I breathe a huge sigh of relief and get on with my day.  It is tiring though, living with that level of fear and having to be strong and give myself a stern talking to every day of my life.

The thing about worry and fear is that, for the most part, they are absolutely futile.  Worrying about having a relapse won’t stop me having a relapse.  Worrying about having anaphylaxis won’t stop me having anaphylaxis (in fact mast cells love stress, so it actually increases my chances!).  When I first got sick I worried about money, but here I am two decades on and I’ve managed.  I worried when I dumped my boyfriend that I’d be lonely, and I am at times, but at others I’m glad I’m single and can do my own thing – I honestly don’t think I would have made the recovery from M.E. I have if I were still in a relationship because other people’s needs take too much energy.  I worried when I was diagnosed with hEDS that the illness would progress and I’d end up in a wheelchair, and the illness has progressed and while I’m not in a wheelchair yet I am a mobility scooter user and I cope.  I worried when I was ill-health retired from work that my life was over, yet here I am still meeting new people and doing new things and if I’d been working full-time I would have been far too busy to take up photography, without which my life would lack passion.

It’s natural to worry but you can’t let it take over your life.  None of us, healthy or sick, knows what the future holds.  I bet the day PC Keith Palmer went to work he didn’t expect to be stabbed to death by a terrorist.   Living each day as it comes is all we can realistically do.  If it’s a good day we cherish it, if it’s a bad day we do our best to get through it, knowing that tomorrow might be better.  After a decade of being bedridden I never thought I’d be driving, walking, owning a dog, writing a blog, have moved house, be winning awards for photography……..or be happy.  In the bleak, dark, wee hours of my worst nights I never imagined for a second that I’d be living a rich, fulfilling, joyful life……….yet here I am.  Anything is possible.

Weekly roundup

I really must make more lists.  As I’m going about my week I think to myself “I’ll tell my readers this on Sunday” but when Sunday comes I can barely remember what I did an hour ago let alone on Tuesday 😉

I do know that I spent the whole of Monday in bed with a migraine due to my attendance at the Photography Salon last weekend.  It was to be expected but still sucked.

The good news is I am feeling so much better since starting the Spatone iron water for my low ferritin and making a concerted effort to include iron-rich veggie foods at every meal and snack.  When I first tried the Spatone it gave me awful nausea, stomach pains and a bit of a runny bum (iron supplements are notorious for giving people gippy stomachs), so I took a break then restarted it a little bit at a time, working up to a full sachet.  I now have no side effects and the daily dizziness I’ve had for months has totally gone 🙂

After 16 days my cold is still lingering.  I’m not alone – a friend at Camera Club also has the bug and has been coughing and sniffling even longer than me.  I woke this morning and my runny nose finally seems to have dried up, only to be replaced by the raging sore throat which started the whole debacle.  WTF?!  I take Sambucol daily (which contains both Vitamin C and concentrated elderberries which are high in mast cell stabilizing quercetin), with added vitamin C in my Spatone, yet the bioflavanoid doesn’t seem to be helping my immune system fight the good fight.  On the plus side my hive outbreak, brought on by my mast cells having a virus-induced hissy fit, has finally cleared up though I did have to use steroid cream on my butt for a week.  For anyone who wants to know the technical ways in which mast cells react to viruses see Lisa’s article here.

I was given a garden centre voucher as a “thank you” when I left my volunteer job as compositor for our Church newsletter recently, so on Tuesday my bezzie and I had lunch out and a potter round a Nursery.  I bought 11 plants which, with my voucher, only cost me £8 🙂  I now have to find the energy from somewhere to actually put them in my garden!  I love gardening but plants are now so expensive I can hardly ever afford to buy any and actually doing any gardening cripples me :-/

I finally exploded over the situation with my 90 year old next door neighbour this week.  She fractured her hip last year and now has great difficulty walking let alone doing anything else.  She has two children who are about as much use as a chocolate fireguard.  My neighbour agreed to home care, but they were terrible – often turning up an hour late and sending someone different every week so that no-one ever knew what needed doing.  It rightly drove my neighbour nuts so she cancelled them.  Her house isn’t just filthy, it’s squalid.  She only has a bath 4 or 5 times a year.  She has a skin condition, which means she has weeping, pussy, bleeding blisters constantly.  She wears blood soiled clothes and sleeps in a blood soiled bed which again only gets changed 4 or 5 times a year.  Her kitchen is so dirty you can hear your feet sticking to the floor when you walk in there.  No-one seems to be helping her and it makes me furious.  It’s now so bad I feel physically sick when I visit as her house is so disgusting.  So on Wednesday, when I was paying my cleaner £10 an hour to clean my house, I went over to my neighbours and cleaned her oven. Four hours and a lot of elbow grease later it’s still only 50% clean but at least it’s something. Her hob is now spotless, but sitting on it is the most disgusting pan and casserole dish you’ve ever seen.  They’re beyond cleaning, so I’m buying her some new ones this week even though I can barely afford it.  She can no longer reach her wall units, so there is food and crockery all over the counter tops which makes cleaning those impossible.  Why aren’t her children sorting all this out?!!  She also has a huge apple tree in her garden, and all the apples have fallen off onto the lawn where they have lain rotting for months.  So for the past two days I’ve been picking up apples and have so far filled 5 dustbin bags which I’ll have to take to the tip.  Her only crime is being old and sick and unable to care for herself.  The District Nurses know about her, Social Services know about her yet she is still left in filth – it’s inhumane.

Yesterday I aged 5 years. I was helping the neighbour mentioned above walk to a seat in her back garden, looked round and Bertie (who had been right next to me) was nowhere to be found.  He has a tendency to wander up the village, so I thought he’d be on the verge at the front of the house. Nope. I called him. Nothing. I then spent 20 minutes running up and down the village like a loony toons shouting his name and couldn’t find him.  I always fear that, being a cute Pedigree, if he’s loose in the village someone going past in a car will snatch him. I was crying and terrified.  I was too exhausted to walk another step, so decided to get my neighbour back into her house so that I could get on my scooter and search further afield. I opened the back door, and there was the Bertster in her kitchen – he had pulled over the waste bin and was busily trying to eat the rubbish. I didn’t know whether to kill him or cuddle him! I have no idea how he got in the house as the back door was shut and why did the stupid git not bark when I was shouting for him if he couldn’t get back out?!

I’m now off to spray my throat with Ultrachloraseptic and am wondering if it’s OK to eat ice cream for breakfast!

 

I am not my disease(es)

I have occasionally been accused by some people who read my blog that I don’t know my stuff.  That I don’t research enough, or read enough, or belong to enough online groups or keep up to date with the latest goings on.  And to a point they’re right.

I have a life y’see.  Outside of my diseases.  I actually like to talk to people in the ‘real world’.  I love being outdoors, watching the local wildlife through my long camera lens.  I spend time in the bath reading Photography magazines.  I waste hours tinkering in my miniscule garden.  There is nothing nicer on a warm day than walking Bertie down by the river and trying to sneak up on the Heron to capture him on film (I haven’t managed it in 3 years but I’m always hopeful 😉 ).  My guilty pleasure is watching Teen Mom on the telly and I’m currently addicted to Broadchurch.  Sometimes I simply lie in my bed and do absolutely bugger all but listen to the birds singing outside and the sound of my dog snoring contentedly beside me………. and it’s heavenly.

I don’t belong to Twitter or Instagram, Snapchat or WhatsApp and I only have 80 Facebook friends (I consider a ‘friend’ to be someone I actually know, not some random stranger I met online last week).  I’m not on any groups or forums.  I don’t have time.  I’m too busy having fun and trying to remain a fully rounded human being despite my physical and mental limitations.  I’m too engrossed smelling the early spring flowers, watching the clouds drift by in the sky and cherishing the sound of the returning Swifts and Lapwings.  In other words, belonging to the real world.

I know I’m lucky to be well enough to enjoy life outside the house, but even during the 10 years I was bedridden I didn’t spend every waking second in cyber space.  I was too busy then trying to get better – resting, meditating, soaking in epsom salt baths and juicing home-sprouted pea shoots.  And it worked (thank you God), at least to a point.

Yes there are people online much more informed than me, who are surgically connected to their computers and available 24/7 (when do these people sleep?!).  They know everything about everything yet are, amazingly, still sick, just like me.  But less happy and content I’d wager.  It can be really stressful being online, and the reason I left all the forums and groups was that some people are just argumentative, negative, rude pillocks and they used to wind me up to bursting point which wasn’t good for my health.  Personally, I would find spending hours a day reading complex research papers boring as all hell and I have no intention of wasting the little mental energy and clarity I have doing that – if and when a cause for M.E., or the gene for hEDS, or the cure for MCAD is found it’ll be splashed all over the news so I won’t have to belong to 20 different Facebook groups to hear about it.

I am more, oh so much more, than my diseases.  I don’t need to know how my genes express themselves (I just know they seem to be angry at me 😉 ), or the fact there have been 5 different studies since Christmas which claim to have found the cause of M.E. (they can’t all be right and I’d bet my life none of them are!), or how physiotherapy is the be all and end all of EDS management (“bollocks” is all I have to say to that).  So I cherry-pick the information I feel is most relevant to me and the forums which are most useful to dip into with specific questions and ignore everything else.  The balance of knowing enough about my diseases to manage them (there is no magic cure or even effective treatments) and inform medical staff about them, yet not so much that they rule my every waking moment works for me, and means that my life is lived in tandem with my illnesses, not consumed by them.

Weekend roundup

And what a weekend it’s been.  I’m exhausted but with a huge sense of achievement, so that’s OK then 🙂

Sat and Sun I attended my first International Photography Salon.  Once a year it’s held in Cumbria and our Camera Club are amongst the hosts, so I was one of the volunteers who helped run the event.  I had to be up at 6am both mornings, dressed, fed and take Bertie to my parents for 7.30am.  I was then collected by some friends in their car and we travelled for an hour to the venue.  By the time we arrived I was knackered and it wasn’t even 9am 😉  The day then finished at 5pm, we travelled the hour home, I had to collect Bertie, drive another 20 minutes back to my house, then start making my dinner.  Needless to say I ate it half propped up in bed as I was so shattered by that stage, and in so much pain, I couldn’t even sit upright!

My job both days involved being on the computer, checking the image being judged matched that shown on screen.  Trust me when I say 6 hours of that each day was mind boggling!  Thankfully I had my wing-man John to help out – I tended to the do the morning shift when I am at my most mentally alert and he did the late afternoon shift when I am usually in bed because I have conked!

The weekend was made even harder by the fact I am still not over my cold.  Ten days now of a runny hose, hacking cough and sore throat, on top of which having a virus has caused my mast cells to ramp up a gear or three and I have a large outbreak of hives on my backside.  Lovely.  However, I coped really well all things considered and am actually rather proud of myself 🙂

As I was only in the admin team and not actually judging, I was allowed to enter some images of my own into the Salon.  I didn’t hold out any hope, as this was my first International Exhibition and there were 15,000 images judged from all over the world.  *However*, I was delighted to discover yesterday that 3 of my images were accepted into the Exhibition and not only that but the image below received an Honourable Mention in the Open Monochrome (ie black & white) section.  OM-flippin-G!!!

An Honourable Mention means that the image scored maximum points but wasn’t selected for a medal.  Still chuffed to bits that this image made the final 20 out of 1,400 images but, and the chap in the photo who is our village grass cutter, will be tickled pink 🙂

I don’t have any results from today, though am not expecting to get anywhere with my colour images.  Mind you, I didn’t expect to get anywhere with my Black & White image either so who knows lol!

Needless to say it will probably now take me several days of bedrest to get over my humongous weekend, but I’m still glad I was able to do it.  I’m sure at events like this where I appear absolutely and utterly ‘normal’ my Camera Club mates must think I exaggerate my illnesses.  Of course, they didn’t see the TENS machine on my back, the brace on my leg, the acupressure sickness bands on my wrists, my neck wrap or my support stockings as they were all hidden under my clothes.  They weren’t with me for my slight mast cell reaction after breakfast today or in the early hours when I couldn’t sleep for hip and back pain.  They were also unaware of the several times over the weekend I felt like I was going to faint, or puke, or both and the fact that at one stage both my arms went completely numb.  And in some ways I’m glad they’re not aware, because that means for just a few hours I can live like a ‘normal’ person and do things a ‘normal’ person does.  I wish, however, that my ‘normal’ friends could endure the payback for me this week because I know it’s going to SUCK!