Tag Archives: cancer

Clueless

I get quite a bit of flack on my blog for dismissing currently popular theories on what causes or cures diseases, in particular that certain foods make us sick or that we can eat ourselves well.  Food, and the effect it has on our body, just isn’t that simple.  For example, we were told for years that saturated fat was bad for us, and then along came coconut oil which despite being a saturated fat actually lowers bad cholesterol and raises good, blowing the saturated fat theory out of the water.  And as I’ve mentioned before on my blog, my parents eat an almost identical diet yet my Mum’s cholesterol is high and my Dad’s is low so there’s obviously more at play than simply what they’re putting in their mouths.

When I developed M.E. I was working on a luxury cruise liner and as an officer I ate in the passenger dining room.  Breakfast was a smorgasboard of wonderful fresh fruits and my evening meal was fit for a king though I opted for salads much of the time as I didn’t want to gain too much weight.  I’m pesco-vegetarian and have never been a big drinker.  In addition I was a regular at the on-board gym and spent many of my evenings dancing the night away.  I lived as “healthily” as it is possible to do yet I still got sick.  My booze guzzling, overweight, smoking, “unhealthy” colleagues did not.  How freakin’ unfair is that?!

My Mum has smoked since the age of 14 and hasn’t exercised for as long as I’ve been alive.  As a consequence her lungs are fucked, she has had a heart attack and her kidneys are packing up.  But despite being an alcoholic for the past 6 years and doing nothing to help her situation, she is nearly 80 and the tumour the doctors found on her lung turned out to be benign.  Her sister, on the other hand, never smoked, didn’t drink, walked everywhere as she couldn’t drive and cooked every single thing she ever ate from scratch yet she died from cancer at the age of 78.

My cousin, the eldest daughter of said Aunt, is 60.  She met her husband when she was a teenager and they have been blissfully married for 40 years.  Neither smoke, rarely drink, are slim, walk daily in the beautiful clean air we have here in the Lake District, her husband is a regular at the gym and my cousin used to teach home economics so is an accomplished cook and like her Mum has always made every item of food from scratch.  They own a second home in the South of France so took early retirement in their fifties and now spend 6 months of the year relaxing by the pool in the sunshine.  You couldn’t find a couple of who live a happier, healthier lifestyle yet both have cancer.  My cousin breast cancer and her husband chronic leukaemia.

In addition, my cousin has zero Vitamin D levels.  How can a person who spends 6 months of every year lying in the mediterranean sun have absolutely no vitamin D when current guidelines tell us that spending just 15-30 minutes each day outside will give us all the Vitamin D we need?  It’s clearly not quite that simple.  Disease, in general, isn’t quite that simple.

My Step-Dad’s Mum moved into sheltered housing at the age of 56, after which she didn’t exercise a day in her life.  She weighed 20 stone (300lbs) and had diabetes, yet despite having a regular blood glucose level of 16 (should be under 7) she didn’t really have any problems and ate whatever the hell she liked.  She lived until she was 103.  103!  And only entered a care home when she was 99.

Much is spoken these days about genes and genetic susceptibility to disease but it’s a very complex area.  I came up negative for the genes associated with Dupytrens Contracture, for example, yet already have a Dupytrens nodule in the palm of my left hand.  DC affects 4 times as many men as women, yet I am female.  When it does affect females it tends to be mild, yet my Mum has severe DC in both hands and has already had three unsuccessful surgeries.  It usually affects the right hand, yet I have it in my left.  So in my case everything I read about DC has turned out to not apply.

My Mum has Ehlers-Danlos, yet has never had the pain or dislocations from which I suffer.  I’d also bet my house on the fact my Brother has the EDS gene yet has never had a single symptom.  If we all have the same genetic disease why is one person crippled with it and another not (and why does the crippled person have to always be me?!).

If exercise staves off Dementia why does my Dad, who until 4 months ago walked the fells every week and who has the blood pressure and cholesterol of a 21 year old, have it?  If eating broccoli staves off Dementia my Dad should never have developed it – he loves the stuff.  If keeping your brain active staves off Dementia why hasn’t it helped my Dad, who regularly does the crossword, has the best long-term memory of anyone I’ve ever met and can work out the maths of a dart board before I’ve even turned my calculator on?  My Mum, of course, has slobbed infront of the telly for the past 15 years smoking and drinking yet her brain is still as sharp as a tack.

As far as I can see we are fairly much clueless as to what causes disease.  We don’t even know why if you put 3 people in a room with the cold virus 1 won’t develop a cold, 1 will catch the cold and 1 will get pneumonia.  If drinking to excess, smoking and not exercising kills you my Mum should have been dead twenty years ago and her sister should have lived another thirty.  Smoking destroys collagen so you would think that my Mum’s EDS would be much worse than mine as a non-smoker, yet the opposite is true.

If I were healthy I swear I would just live however the hell I liked.  I would drink and eat whatever I fancied.  I would exercise if I wanted to and not if I didn’t.   It appears to me that health, for the most part, is as much a game of Russian Roulette as anything we do or don’t do.  Life is too short to live it denying ourselves pleasure or doing stuff because we think we should, not because we enjoy it (does anyone really enjoying spinning classes or doing 30 crunchies before breakfast?!).  Now where did I put the humongous box of Wine Gums Santa so kindly left under my tree……….

 

 

Advertisements

Comparisons

Blimey, I seem to have a lot to say this week!  I blame my hormones, I’m feeling quite arsey 😉

I read an article on The Mighty about comparing all illnesses to cancer which really resonated with me.  Chronic illnesses are trivialized in general and M.E. is near the bottom of the chronic illness food chain.  It’s not seen as a ‘real’ disease to start with and certainly not one which deserves a huge amount of empathy or understanding.

I’ve lost count of the number of times my tests have come back normal and some well meaning medic has said to me “good news, there’s nothing sinister”.  In other words, there’s no cancer.  Which, don’t get me wrong, is wonderful but I’m still left being unable to eat, or passing out, or in agonizing pain with no explanation and consequently no treatment.  For 20 years.

One of the most hurtful things my Mum has ever said to me is about her sister, who sadly died of ovarian cancer.   “Your poor Auntie, I’ve never seen anyone suffer the way she did for those two years.”  Er, what about your daughter who spent ten years in bed having seizures, unable to eat anything solid for a whole year, unable to speak for a whole year, whose hair fell out and has not grown back, who was terrified, isolated, in dreadful pain, unable to sleep, whose feet turned in so she was unable to walk, whose hands turned in so she couldn’t even pick up a cup………..the list could go on and on.  And who now faces a future of chronic pain, increasing disability and the daily threat of anaphylactic shock.   My Aunt had a loving husband, three loving children and partners, a Macmillan Nurse, a fabulous GP, attended a support group for cancer patients every week and was hospitalized when needed.  Not left in a bed alone for a decade without care of any kind.  She was 76 years old, with a full life behind her, family, memories…….not 26 with her whole life ahead of her.  She did pass away but she’d lived first.

My cousin’s husband is sixty and two years ago was diagnosed with chronic leukaemia, a disease you can live with for many years and which often doesn’t even need treatment.  He is receiving excellent care, has three monthly checkups and every time anyone meets his wife they ask after him and offer help and support.  No-one even asks after me any more.  My Mum regularly sees my cousin and knows all about her husband’s treatment, yet when we speak she’s totally lost interest in how I’m feeling.  Well, it has been 23 years so I’d imagine it gets a bit boring listening to me reel off which part of my body is hurting today.

I’m not comparing the two diseases, simply pointing out the different way cancer is treated by both medical staff and the public compared to a chronic illness.  It’s like we should be glad our disease hasn’t killed us (even though both my M.E. and MCAD have had a bloody good go) and of course I am, but that doesn’t negate the lifetime of suffering I’ve gone through.  I’ve had back pain for 40 years now and when you’re allergic to painkillers and can take nothing to give yourself a break trust me when I say it really gets you down, especially on top of the thirty odd other symptoms I also have.

From the get go I’ve been told I should be “glad it’s not cancer” but I’m not sure why I should be glad to have illnesses that have made me spend half my adult life in bed too exhausted to feed myself, have robbed me of a husband and children, holidays, fun, employment, money, sleep, food, the ability to walk or even sit up some days, pain so severe I want to take a knife to my body parts, nausea, retching so severe I’ve damaged my oesophagus, my ability to read, speak or write like I once did and all the things which really make us who we are and our lives meaningful.  Since when did that become trivial or irrelevant?

There are excellent provisions for people with cancer.  Specialist hospitals, nurses, and clinics and if you have cancer you can get to see a GP the same day – they might even come to see you.  Yet there is nothing for M.E., EDS or MCAD in the whole of the north of England.  Not a specialist Consultant, not a specialist Clinic, not specialist Nurses or specialist Physios and if I want to see my GP it takes me 6-8 weeks.  I receive no care whatsoever.  And it’s not right.  It’s not right to make one disease more important than any other.  It’s not right to say that one person’s suffering is worse than another person’s suffering.  It’s not right to treat one person’s pain and ignore another person’s pain.  It’s not right to recognize the emotional impact one disease has on a person and ignore the emotional impact another disease has on a person.

You can’t compare diseases.  Is Cancer worse than Parkinson’s?  Is Parkinson’s worse than ALS?  Is ALS worse than Schizophrenia?  Is Schizophrenia worse than Cystic Fibrosis?  Where is the line?  How is one disease compassion and treatment worthy and another not?  Is the possibility of death the only reason to treat disease?  What happened to easing pain and distress or do we not have the money for that?  What price suffering?

Research trends

I’ve mentioned recently my frustration at the current research trend in the M.E. world to focus on energy production when, as a sufferer, I know that the ‘fatigue’ (for want of a better term) I experience is merely a symptom of immune activation not the root cause of my disease. Researchers have been studying energy production, in particular the mitochondria, as a cause for M.E. for over 20 years now and still haven’t found anything, which leads me to conclude there is nothing to find.  I’m not suggesting that mitochondrial dysfunction isn’t part of the disease picture but it’s definitely not the cause.  I wish these people would talk to patients more, especially we old timers who’ve lived with the illness for decades!

I’m equally unconvinced by the current trend to put every ailment known to man down to gut issues (SIBO, flora, bacteria etc) – it just feels like the current ‘hot new thing’ in a very long line of ‘hot new things’ on which to pin disease.  My Dad excitedly kept an article out of his newspaper for me this week which touted “answer to chronic fatigue syndrome found in the gut” and, much as I love him, I just sighed.  Here’s the thing: most cases of M.E. start with some kind of viral or toxic event (OP poisoning, vaccinations) but the event is different in all of us – mine was a tummy bug, yours might have been glandular fever, someone else’s a Hep B vaccine.   If we’d all started with a tummy bug then I’d be much more open to the disturbed gut theory, but we didn’t.  The one thing we share is immune activation, so for me the answer has to lie in the immune system and in particular its response to viral or toxic trauma.  As I’ve said before, if researchers studied why people with the flu are so weak and exhausted they can barely get out of bed they’d go a long way to finding out the cause of M.E.  In fact, it gobsmacks me that no-one has looked at that before now!

No offence to my American friends, but there is a mould trend going on in the States with everyone convinced that mould is the root cause of their issues and it makes me want to chuckle.  Northern England is wet for 10 (sometimes 12) months of the year, humid in summer, we mostly live in houses which are at least 100 years old and inherently damp, so I’m sure mould is everywhere.  We couldn’t escape it if we tried.  Yet not every Brit you meet is sick and we don’t have a larger M.E. population than any other country as far as I’m aware.  Obviously rampant mould growth, where you have black stuff growing on your ceiling, is hazardous to health and must be dealt with but other than that we in the UK don’t give mould a second’s thought – it’s been around a lot longer than we have and as a species we’ve managed to survive.

I’m just as cynical about the current inflammatory trend.  Inflammation, it seems, is everywhere and is causing total havoc.  Only of course it’s almost impossible to measure inflammation or to say, if inflammation is present, why it’s there and whether it’s a good thing or a bad thing.  When we cut ourselves the wound is immediately inflamed which is a painful, but absolutely necessary, part of our body’s response and vital for healing.  And before anyone comments, yes I know there’s a difference between acute and chronic inflammation but who’s to say chronic inflammation isn’t just as protective as acute?  It’s got to be there for a reason and we’d do better to find out why our bodies are enlisting our inflammatory response, rather than blaming the inflammation itself.

Going off-topic slightly, the trend of foods purportedly giving you every disease from cancer to Alzheimer’s drives me insane.  We have no idea what causes Cancer and even less idea what causes dementia, so for anyone to say “burnt sausages give you cancer” or “broccoli reduces your risk of Alzheimer’s” is absolutely absurd and makes me furious.  In fact, I’d go as far as to say researchers who tout this nonsense should be prosecuted.  The same goes for anti-inflammatory foods.  If we have no accurate way of measuring inflammation, how do we know what foods affect it?!

There have been articles in the newspaper this year saying “exercise staves off dementia” and “lack of sleep increases risk of dementia” and I think “what a crock of shit!”  My Dad, who is 78, still walks 8 miles a week up a mountain and, as a former marathon runner, has exercised vigorously his entire life.   He’s never had insomnia and sleeps 9-10 hours a night without a problem, yet has dementia.  My Mum, on the other hand, hasn’t exercised since she was a child and wakes at least twice a night every night, yet she is totally mentally on the ball (when she’s not drunk!).  All these articles do is play on people’s emotions.  We don’t have a clue what causes Cancer or Alzheimer’s and that lack of control scares us, so we focus on what we eat or how much we exercise because those are two things we can control and it makes us feel better.

I’m no psychologist, but much of the information currently touted as being bad for our health, or good for our health, is environmental – sleep, exercise, food and living conditions.  In other words, all things we can control.  We’re extremely fearful of the fact that Alzheimer’s or Cancer might be viral, bacterial, or genetic, or even worse some novel new thing we as yet know nothing about, and therefore outside of our control.  We’re fairly arrogant us humans and think that we have power over our bodies, when in fact life is mostly just random and shit simply happens.  If keeping mentally alert staves off Alzheimer’s how come author Terry Prachett developed it in his 50s?  If the phytoestrogens found in soya stave off breast cancer how come soy munching vegetarian Linda McCartney died from the disease?  How come my Mum, a lifelong smoker, couch potato and current alcoholic, is nearly 80 and has never had cancer and her non-smoking, tea-total, bike riding sister died from it?  None of it makes sense and that’s the very thing that scares us the most.