Peri-menopause: I have no words!

Soooo, I started my period today.  It’s day 25 of my cycle.  For the first three months of this year I was back to a 28 day cycle, but the last two months I’ve been down to a 25 day cycle, just to keep me on my toes.

Yesterday I felt OK(ish).  I was extra tired, had cramps and (TMI warning!) my bits were sore because the environment ‘down there’ isn’t as moist as it used to be and my undies chaff, but I still felt well enough for a potter round a nearby plant nursery with my friend.  Went to bed last night and all was fine.

Woke this morning at 5am, which is ridiculous.  So I put my talking book on (Michael J. Fox’s memoir ‘Lucky Man’ which discusses his early onset Parkinsons Disease) and must have dozed back off because the next thing I knew it was 7.30am.  Now that’s more like it.

Got up to feed Bertie, made myself a brew, and went back to bed for Bert’s morning tummy rub and to ‘come to’.  But by the time I reached the top of the stairs I knew something was amiss.  I started to sweat.  Everywhere.  It ran in rivers off my head and down my back.  And then I felt all the colour draining from my face and the world started to swim.  Hmmm, I think I’d better lie down before I fall down.  I collapsed onto the bed like a rag doll.  Bert nudged me for a bit then decided he obviously wasn’t getting his tummy rubbed and promptly went to sleep.  Typical bloke 😉

I felt horrendous and like I was going to pass out, even though I was lying down.  I have a ceiling fan above my bed, so I turned that on.  It felt lovely and cool on my skin, but poor Bert started to shiver, so I covered him with my half of the duvet.  I also had god awful period pain and my hip bones felt like they were on fire.

I keep a blood pressure monitor under my bed, so I fished it out and took a reading.  79/45!!!!!  And my pulse was 43.  WTF?!

I then realized I needed the loo.  Urgently.  As I sat on the throne, sweating like a roasting hog, I didn’t know whether I was going to poop, puke or pass out.  This is when living alone can be quite scary.  For the next hour I staggered between my bed and the loo, with horrendous diarrhea and chilling sweats.  Even my lips were white and I couldn’t sit upright without wanting to pass out.

Then my period actually arrived and over the next two hours things mercifully started to calm down.  I put my TENS machine on both my back and stomach, so the cramping pain lifted slightly (though as I’m typing this I still feel like someone is inside my uterus with a blow torch).  I managed to have a drink.  And my BP came up to a more respectful 104/54 (which admittedly is my usual BP for when I’m sleeping, not awake and upright).

It’s now evening and I’ve finally managed to eat something.  I still feel rubbish, but it’s a ‘normal’ period-induced rubbish, not the I-think-I’m-about-to-die rubbish I felt this morning.  I’m going to run a bath now because I feel truly icky – I just hope the heat doesn’t send my BP plummeting too far again.

I have no idea what this was all about and I hope it doesn’t happen again any time soon.   When is the menopause going to happen?  When?!  I just want my periods to be over with because all this malarkey for the past 36 years has been like some kind of torture!

 

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6 thoughts on “Peri-menopause: I have no words!

  1. kneillbc

    I hate to say it…but um, that was about anaphylaxis, maybe? I know you aren’t as well aquainted aquainted with Ana, as I am, but have you actually met? Do you think, perhaps, she is trying to make her way in? Perhaps you’re allergic to progesterone- as I saw mentioned somewhere else? Let’s see: Sweating, pallor, low BP, nausea, diarrhea, sense of impending doom….that sounds like a whole lot of Ana to me…

    I sincerely hope not. But, as you know, ana can creep in, slowly…insidiously making itself part of your life. Next time…call somebody, ok? Just in case you DO pass out. Do you have an epi-pen? Can you take epi?

    And, as you roll your eyes at me- (it’s okay, I know you’re doing it), consider that I recall you saying the exact same thing to someone else not that long ago… 😊

    I read an article posted on one of the FaceBook groups about the use of epi in ER’s. The researchers went over all the admission records of patients coming to the ER for allergic reactions. On average, epinephrine was not administered 60% of the times it should have been, if they were following set guidelines. In some ER’s, it was up to 80% of the time!!!!😳 Considering how I was treated at the ER last week, those figures don’t surprise me as much, but still. I wonder how often you, and I, and all kinds of other people with allergies/twitchy mast cells should have taken our epi, and didn’t…

    On the other hand, epi means a trip to the ER. That sucks, and it’s just as likely to make you sicker as make you well…

    Or you could train Bertie to be a service dog! (Then again, maybe not). Take care, you!
    Karen

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    1. Jak Post author

      LOL, you know me too well Karen 😉 Having had dozens of grade III anaphylactic episodes, and one grade IV, I’m certain this wasn’t ana – it didn’t fee the same as any of my other reactions. I just think it was stupidly low blood pressure. I get diahorrea every month and have done all my life – it’s the cramping which sets that off. It has been queried in the past whether or not I have endometriosis and if I do it could be internal bleeding causing the very low BP. Of course, endo would require surgery to diagnose and as I’m allergic to all the drugs used during surgery it’s not something I’d consider :-/

      I don’t have an epi pen, but am seeing my GP next week and it’s on my discussion list. *However*, I’m allergic to steroids and antihistamines, so I’d have to literally be at death’s door to inject myself in case I’m allergic to the adrenalin!

      As for Bertie, I can’t even train him to come when I call him – the big useless lump 😉 x

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      1. Elizabeth Milo

        I’ve never used my Epi-pen (knock on wood) for exactly that reason – I can’t even do epinephrine at the dentist because I have such such a bad reaction to it. When I was healthy, they gave it to me accidentally and I was ok – not allergic – but I had much more severe reactions than normal people. I do wonder what that sensitivity has morphed into now that I react to so much more.

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  2. Robin

    I can’t speak to whether or not this was anaphylaxis as suggested by Karen. I can only say I never experienced anything like this during peri-men, menopause, or post-men. Hope you figure it out. Scary stuff!

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  3. Elizabeth Milo

    Besides the diarrhea, this sounds EXACTLY like what I go through. It is absolutely terrifying. For me, I (now) know it is a mast cell reaction to my period, but it’s all tied up with my bowels and blood pressure. Horrific. You poor thing, no one should go through this! X

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    1. Jak Post author

      Got to admit it wasn’t the nicest 3 hours of my life :-/ Like to said to Karen though, it didn’t feel like my other mast cell reactions – it just felt like low blood pressure. I’ve had awful periods since I started aged 11 and I’ve had enough now. I’m sure this month was so bad because I’ve stopped my H1 blockers – they really helped my period pain. So mast cells are definitely involved in this reaction, I’m just not sure it was an anaphylactic reaction like I usually get to things. That probably makes no sense at all lol! Sorry you have this as well – being a girl flippin sucks :-/

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